Sunday, 25 February 2018

Brief Encounter - The Lowry, Salford

Brief Encounter was voted the twelfth best British Film by Time Out magazine in 2017. The 1945 romantic drama shows Laura, a wife and mother, have a chance encounter with a handsome stranger on a railway station that she falls in love with.

The film starring Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard started life as the play Still Life by Noel Coward. The Times critiqued it as “a serious and sympathetic study of humdrum people suddenly trapped in love”. Ten years later, Noel Coward's play was brought to life on the big screen by David Lean. It became one of cinemas masterpieces, nominated for three Oscars and for a number of years it was voted one of the best films ever made.

Released just after the end of WWII, it showed the British stiff upper lip in all its glory. Focusing on the day to day drudgery people went through, shopping, returning library books and taking some solace in a trip to the cinema; it also showed underneath the façade that a generation of people who had survived the war were only just about holding things together.

Unlike most tales, there aren’t good people and bad people in this story. This story works because everyone is essentially good, but trying to make hard decisions. Trying to make the right choice is never easy; today it is often hard to go with what we want and what society will allow. This is probably why it is a film that despite its age will never grow old.

I wasn’t sure how Emma Rice could bring this classic film to life on stage, but she has waved her magic wand and created a wonderful image of a story which echoes the film. She hasn’t pushed the classic film to one side; she has incorporated it into her play, made it an important part of the production. Sitting in the theatre, looking at the red stage curtains, as the lights go down and the usherettes pass amongst the crowd, you’d be forgiven for thinking you were about to watch the film.

‘I’m a happily married woman. Or rather I was until a few weeks ago. This is my whole world and it’s enough, or rather it was until a few weeks ago.’

Housewife Laura (Isabel Pollen) bumps into married GP Alec (Jim Sturgeon) at a railway station café. She has something in her eye and Alec comes to her rescue, removing the piece of grit and embarking upon a magical romance. But this production highlights not only the romance developing between Alec and Laura, but also the throws of young love between Beryl and Stanley and the last chance romance between Myrtle and Albert. Each relationship is given the stage time it needs to exhibit the magic and the heartbreak that love can bring.

Beryl (Beverly Rudd) and Stanley (Jos Slovick) bring an air of carefree fun as they steal a kiss and a cuddle after work before heading off to the chippy. Rudd’s charm and comic timing is impeccable and she takes your breath away as she belts out several musical numbers. Then there is Myrtle (Lucy Thackeray) who brings a warm charm as she dishes out cups of milky tea and freshly baked buns to the customers of the railway café, making sure there’s always an extra something special for stationmaster Albert (Dean Nolan).

In amongst the mirth and merriment there is the growing love story between the quintessentially British Alec and Laura. As the lovers head out in a rowing boat (that very romantic British pastime) they literally fall into the brink. The scene cleverly switches from a black and white movie of the actors on a screen to becoming real life colour as a boat on wheels is moved around the stage.

‘That’s how it all began. Just by me getting a little piece of grit in my eye.’

The majority of the play takes place at the station. From a toy train being pulled around the stage, to a black and white projected train pulling into a platform, to a smoke machine covering the stage as the steam train rattles on by; it was inspiring to see just how many different incarnations of a train arriving and leaving a railway station that there could be.

This is theatre at its best. It is a memorable show which embraces the original film with dazzling performances from a multi-talented cast who not only sing but play big brass band numbers throughout the show.

Following a run at the Birmingham Rep Theatre and The Lowry, Salford, the play moves to London for a six month run in the West End. (2nd March to 2nd September 2018.)

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